Cat Alford joins Grant Baldwin on How Did You Get Into That today to talk about freelance writing and blogging as a sustainable, successful business.

132 – How to Be a Freelance Writer, with Catherine Alford

Cat Alford joins Grant Baldwin on How Did You Get Into That today to talk about freelance writing and blogging as a sustainable, successful business.Have you ever wanted to make a living as a writer or blogger? Today’s guest is here to tell you how you can. Catherine Alford of Budget Blonde spends her days writing and getting paid for it.

In this episode, she shares how her love of writing has never left her, why she decided to pursue this career path and her best stratagems for creating a successful writing and blogging business today.

Listen in to hear all of that and so much more on today’s edition of How Did You Get Into That?.

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW

  • How does she keep her content fresh?
  • Has Catherine always wanted to be a writer?
  • Why did she focus on writing about finances?
  • How do you make a full-time living from blogging and writing?
  • How comments can help you land writing posts.
  • When is it the right time to pitch someone for a writing gig?
  • Why are conferences so important to growing your income?
  • And much, much more!

BONUS MATERIAL:

  • What would she do differently today to start and build a blog?
  • The necessity of networking for success.
  • What strategies and tips does she have for freelance writers and bloggers?

If you enjoyed this episode and want to hear a few additional minutes of the interview, Click here to get the exclusive bonus material.

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Aaron Walker talks success and significance on this episode of How Did You Get Into That?.

131 – How to Be Successful and Significant, with Aaron Walker


Aaron Walker talks success and significance on this episode of How Did You Get Into That?.

Many of us strive to be successful at our chosen profession and to make a good life for ourselves and our families.

But what if part of true success means also being significant to others? Our guest for today’s show has dedicated his life and business to helping people be both successful and significant.

In this episode, Aaron Walker of View From The Top, joins us to talk about how he helps men go from ordinary to extraordinary by reevaluating their lives, their businesses and where they focus their efforts. Tune in to hear all of that and so much more on today’s edition of How Did You Get Into That?.

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW

  • How to identify what success means to you.
  • How can you make your life significant to others?
  • Why Aaron contributes to people who can’t pay him back.
  • The important role delayed gratification has played in his success.
  • Is happiness a trait or is it a choice?
  • Of all the things he could do with his life why did he chose coaching?
  • Why did he come out of retirement?
  • And much, much more!

BONUS MATERIAL:

  • How do you identify what you want out of life?
  • Is it important to write down your goals?
  • Accountability partners: why do you need one?

If you enjoyed this episode and want to hear a few additional minutes of the interview, Click here to get the exclusive bonus material.

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JoanneWiebe of CopyHacker talks about copywriting on this episode of How Did You Get Into That.

130 – How to Write Convincing Copy, with Joanna Wiebe


JoanneWiebe of CopyHacker talks about copywriting on this episode of How Did You Get Into That.

What if your words could persuade people to take action? Our guest for today’s show, Joanna Wiebe, is a successful copywriter who does just that in her business.

In this episode, Joanna tells her story of how she fell into copywriting, and eventually started Copy Hackers. Copy Hackers helps businesses write better copy to gain and retain customers.

Joanna joins us to share why copywriting can be a great career for any writer, how her college experience impacts her career today, and so much more on today’s edition of How Did You Get Into That?.

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW

  • Why doesn’t Joanna believe English is a useless college major?
  • How did a family tragedy help Joanna reevaluate her career trajectory?
  • What other types of writing does Joanna do?
  • How did a business emerge from free advice that Joanna gave?
  • The importance of discipline when it comes to writing.
  • How Joanna accidentally quit her corporate job!
  • Where can you learn to write better copy?
  • And much, much more!

BONUS MATERIAL:

  • What are the steps to getting started as a writer?
  • How do you build a portfolio?
  • Joanna shares her best resources for aspiring writers.

If you enjoyed this episode and want to hear a few additional minutes of the interview, Click here to get the exclusive bonus material.

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storytelling how did you get into that don miller blue like jazz

129 – How to Use Story In Your Business, with Donald Miller

storytelling how did you get into that don miller blue like jazzStorytelling has long been how people create connection and share common bonds. Before the written word we told stories and passed them on from generation to generation. The way we use story today in business is no different: we use to create connection, establish and expand bonds with each other.

Here today to share how he’s made a living linking the two – storytelling and business – is best-selling author and successful serial entrepreneur Donald Miller.

Donald shares his insights on how we can integrate story into our businesses, why it’s played such a pivotal role in his life and why stories are fundamentally about selling; all of that and much more on this episode of How Did You Get Into That?.

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW

  • Why he’s always wanted to be a writer.
  • How writing is a form of sales, even fiction writing.
  • What opened his eyes to the business side of writing.
  • What is Storyline and what is Storybrand?
  • How to become the person you say you want to be.
  • The 3 aspects you need in your life to experience deep meaning.
  • And so much more!

BONUS MATERIAL:

  •  How do we apply story to business?
  •  Why does story resonate with him so much?
  • What is the most powerful and compelling tool to a human brain?

If you enjoyed this episode and want to hear a few additional minutes of the interview, Click here to get the exclusive bonus material.

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natalia sisson suitcase entrepreneur how did you get into that

128 – How to be a Suitcase Entrepreneur, with Natalie Sisson


natalia sisson suitcase entrepreneur how did you get into that

Have you ever fantasized about spending your days traveling the world – and still running a successful business? Our guest for today’s show has done and continues to do just that – she’s the suitcase entrepreneur.

She didn’t start out as an entrepreneur, but she’s had an adventurous spirit all her life! On this episode Natalie shares her transition from 8 years in the corporate world to living life on the road, and building a successful enterprise in the process.

Natalie Sisson joins us to talk freedom, adventure, entrepreneurship and much more on this episode of How Did You Get Into That?.

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW

  • How many countries has Natalie been to?
  • How many streams of income does she have?
  • What was one of the first books about online business I read?
  • Where does her travel/freedom/adventure bug come from?
  • How did she go from broke to 15k in one month?
  • Natalie’s practical steps to start building and living the life you truly desire.
  • And so much more!

BONUS MATERIAL:

  • What is one of Natalie’s craziest travel stories and what can you learn from it?
  •  What tools and apps does she recommend to make traveling easier?

If you enjoyed this episode and want to hear a few additional minutes of the interview, Click here to get the exclusive bonus material.

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Mike Vardy productivity productivityist

127 – How to Be More Productive with Mike Vardy


Mike Vardy productivity productivityist

Do you wish you had better time management skills? Today’s guest, Mike Vardy, is your answer! Mike runs a website called Productivityist, where he teaches how to be more productive on a daily basis.

Mike shares his journey from Costco employee to productivity strategist, speaker, and coach. Mike explains how he found his niche, the importance of relating to clients on a human level, and much more on this episode of How Did You Get Into That?.

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW

  • How did Mike combine his passion for comedy with a seemingly unrelated topic?
  • How has Mike differentiated himself in a saturated market?
  • What was Mike’s first productivity writing gig?
  • What’s more important in terms of productivity: quantity or quality?
  • What is Mike’s advice for building relationships with a role model?
  • Does Mike have a typical client?
  • And so much more!

BONUS MATERIAL:

  • What acronym does Mike use for prioritizing and scheduling?
  • How can you be more intentional in terms of productivity?
  • What are Mike’s favorite productivity tools?

If you enjoyed this episode and want to hear a few additional minutes of the interview, Click here to get the exclusive bonus material.

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more-confident-speaker-image

How To Become A More Confident Speaker

more-confident-speaker-image

The idea of being a speaker sounds really cool. You get to stand on stage and inspire, motivate, and teach an audience. What’s not to like?

Oh, except for that part where you have to actually talk.

In front of people.

Who sometimes look like they want to hurt you.

That part can freak people out and understandably so. One of the most common questions I get from speakers is how they can become more confident when they’re on stage.

First, let’s address another common and related question…

Grant…do you still get nervous when you go on stage?

Generally, yes.

I’m usually nervous for the first 30 seconds, because those first few seconds give me a really good read on how the rest of the talk is going to go.

But I don’t think having a few butterflies is such a bad thing for you or me. I think it’s actually a good thing.

If anything, when you have nerves before speaking, it means you care. It means what you’re getting ready to do matters.

Were you nervous on that first date? Were you nervous in that big job interview? Were you nervous when you got engaged? Were you nervous when your child was born?

YES!

Why?

Because those moments matter and your body is reacting accordingly. So if you’re nervous, it means you’re probably doing something right.

Get Started As A Speaker!

A free, 9 lesson course that will give you the plan you’re looking for to help you become a speaker.

Get Started As A Speaker Today!

Speaking also causes nerves because the reality is you never know what’s going to happen. Every audience is different. Every environment is different. You have no idea how any given audience is going to respond.

As an example, I just finished a few days of speaking at Iowa State University. They bring me in every August to speak to their incoming freshmen about personal finance. I do the same talk six times in two days as they keep cycling groups of hundreds of new students through the room.

What’s always interesting to me is even though I’m doing the EXACT SAME TALK six different times, it’s for six completely different audiences, so each session ends up being slightly different than the others.

Some audiences are more engaged than others. Some are more tired than others. Some are more excited than others. Each is different.

So as a speaker, it can be a little unnerving, because you never really know what you’re going to get.

You don’t know how they’re going to react. You don’t know if they’re going to be engaged. You don’t know if they’re going to laugh at your jokes. You just don’t know.

It’s like you’re literally walking a tight rope over the audience just praying you get to the other side in one piece.

With all this mind, no wonder we feel nerves when we speak 🙂

But the bigger question is how do you control those nerves?

I’ve found 3 things that have helped me to be a more confident speaker…

1. Practice

A Lot. I have spent hours and hours pacing my office, my basement or hotel rooms going over my talks. Here’s the balance I’m looking for…I want to be comfortable enough with my material that I know where I’m going, but not overly rehearsed where it feels robotic.

I want it to feel like I’m having a casual conversation with the audience. But that means that I need to know my content and where I’m going really well.

Think of it like this…if I were to ask you, “tell me about when you got engaged?” (or some other significant life moment), you would feel pretty confident in telling that story, because you lived it. It’s a part of you. You wouldn’t need your notes.

But if I asked you a week later to tell me the same story, I bet it would be slightly different but the gist of the story would stay the same.

That’s the balance of knowing where a talk is going but not being so robotic that you’ve memorized it verbatim.

Here’s another way to think of it…you remember taking tests in high school and college? Of course you do (insert horrible emotional flashback trauma).

When you would walk in on test day, you would have one of two feelings…

1. “We’re taking a test today! OMG! You didn’t tell us we had a test today!!! Jesus take the wheel!”

2. “I got this. Give me the test. Let’s do this. You can use mine as the answer key if you need to.”

One feeling is fear and the other is confidence.

The difference was in how well you prepared.

Speakers who show up and just go through the motions or “just wing it” are not good speakers. Speakers who spend a lot of time practicing, rehearsing and honing their material are much more confident on stage.

2. Get At-Bats

Like a lot of kids growing up, I spent several summers playing baseball. My major league dreams of playing with the Cardinals were quickly dashed when I got hit a few times by a fastball and realized I was not nearly tough enough to play.

But I remember several times going to the batting cages with my dad and just taking practice swing after practice swing.

I knew that was the only way to get better. You have to get at-bats.

I could sit in my room and read books or articles about bat speed, proper batting stance and swing theory (not even sure if that’s a thing), but the best way to learn was to actually do it.

I also played a lot of basketball growing up and spent hours practicing free throws. Free throw after free throw after free throw.

I would play mental games telling myself I needed to make the next two shots in order for our team to win the championship.

I remember practicing with a team I played on and having everyone yell, scream and try to distract me while I shot. Or the pressure of having to make a free throw or the entire team has to run sprints (that sucked).

But these “at-bats” made me better.

And the best way I know of to become a better speaker is to actually speak.

Stop reading posts (finish this one first…you’ve come so far).

Stop watching TED talks.

Stop pretending to be a speaker.

And start getting at-bats.

Look for any and all opportunities you can find to speak. Give presentations at work. Speak at a local Rotary Club or Toastmasters. Teach a Sunday school class at church. Be a guest speaker at a local school.

How do you become a better speaker?

You speak.

As you speak more, you become more confident in your material, in your presentation skills and in handling an audience. You learn what works and what doesn’t. You are literally getting on-the-job training.

And that makes you better.

3. Relax

We’ve already established how nerve-wracking it can be standing on a stage in front of a live audience hoping they don’t eat you alive.

But let’s turn the tables for a second. Let’s put you in the position of the audience. You’ve been out there before listening to a speaker right?

As an audience member, what do you prefer to listen to…a crappy speaker or an engaging speaker? Do you want to see a speaker fumble their way through a talk and make a fool of themselves or would you prefer they come prepared and not waste your time?

Here’s the lesson…the audience is on your side. They want you to do good. They really don’t want you to suck, because they don’t want to have to sit through it.

As speakers, sometimes we have this “us versus them” mentality like the audience hates us. They don’t!

Internally, they want nothing more than for you to do good. They’re on your side!

So take a deep breath and stop assuming they’re against you. They’re not.

As a speaker, you’re always going to have some nerves. I’m pretty confident when i walk out on stage, but I still feel those nerves. And I hope that feeling never goes away.

So how do you become more confident as a speaker?

1. Practice. A lot. Be really super comfortable with your material and where you’re going.

2. Get At-Bats. Take advantage of every opportunity you can to speak.

3. Relax. The audience doesn’t want you to suck. They would prefer you be awesome. So do that.

You got this.

Now go do it.

Get Started As A Speaker!

A free, 9 lesson course that will give you the plan you’re looking for to help you become a speaker.

Get Started As A Speaker Today!

Image courtesy of: Sandwich

TimGrahl

126 – How to Launch a Best-Selling Book, with Tim Grahl


TimGrahl

One of the hottest marketing trends is to publish a book. Whatever your specialty or your career path becoming a published author is one of the most significant ways to establish yourself as an authority.

On this episode Tim Grahl, author and book marketing extraordinaire, talks about the strategies he’s used to help such notable people as Ramit Sethi, Guy Kawasaki, Dan Pink and Barbara Corcoran launch and market best-selling books.

We discuss why you need to build your platform before you want to release your book, why publishers aren’t going to market for you and much more on the 126th edition of How Did You Get Into That?.

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW:

  • Why your email list is your top asset when launching your book.
  • How can you optimize for freedom? Tim explains.
  • The two ways to know what you – and anyone else – value most.
  • How he learned online marketing and online advertising.
  • Why he made the leap to work only with authors.
  • What’s the fastest way to build up a client list in ANY industry?
  • And so much more!

BONUS MATERIAL:

  • If he started over from nothing what is the first thing he’d do?
  • When is the best time and the best way to network?
  • What’s the easiest way to do outreach?

If you enjoyed this episode and want to hear a few additional minutes of the interview, Click here to get the exclusive bonus material.

EPISODE RESOURCES


three-levels-being-online-business-brand

The Three Levels Of Being An Online Business Brand

three-levels-being-online-business-brand

In the online business space, there are a lot of big name brands. People everyone knows and whose names we frequently throw around as success stories and case studies.

When someone wants to start an online business, they often look to these big names as examples of what they want to build someday.

I want to have a blog, a podcast, a course, a membership community, a SAAS app, a fancy autoresponder sequence, speaking engagements and a bestselling book that teaches people something about having a business, chasing a passion, and have an awesomely awesome life of awesomeness.

We want that because that’s what the big names have. But those big names are often at level 3 of the game.

Like with anything in life, you can’t get to level 3 without first going through level 2 and you can’t get to level 2 without going through level 1.

Seems simple enough right?

Grant, what the crap are you talking about with these levels?

I’m glad you asked.

Level 1 in business requires that you get really good at something.

Level 2 is that you teach what you learned in level 1.

Level 3 allows you to move to other markets and niches.

Let me give you some examples to demonstrate this…

Pat Flynn

Pat’s brand teaches people how to build smart, passive income streams. But Pat didn’t come right out of the gate and start there. He started by creating and selling an ebook to teach people how to pass a random architectural exam (level 1).

As he continued to learn more about that and dial in how to best do it, it gave him the credibility and platform to teach it to others (level 2). Today he teaches on a variety of related subjects that have nothing to do with writing and selling an ebook (level 3), but because he went through the first two levels, he can do that.

Michael Hyatt

Michael has positioned himself as “Your Virtual Mentor.” It’s a great brand and one many people would love to do. Being a virtual mentor sounds cool. But long before he planted his stake in the ground for that, he taught people about publishing.

He was the CEO of Thomas Nelson publishing and was an expert in that space (level 1). It allowed him to then teach on that topic (level 2). After building that platform as a publishing expert, he’s been able to go more broad and teach people about goal-setting, platform-building, and writing a blog (level 3).

Amy Porterfield

Amy is known for Facebook marketing. It’s a hot topic that a lot of people are interested in, and Amy knows that world inside and out. Amy got really good at Facebook marketing (level 1) and then began teaching it to others through courses (level 2).

Today, in addition to Facebook marketing, she teaches people about list-building, sales funnelsk webinars and other online business topics (level 3). But that doesn’t happen unless she first starts with getting really good at Facebook marketing.

Let me give you one more example…

Tim Ferris

If you said you were at level 1 and wanted to build an audience around lifestyle design, health & fitness, and write a book about learning disguised as a cookbook, people would think you’re crazy. Tim started at level 1 by writing what he’s most commonly known for, The 4-Hour Work Week.

He not only lived that life but then taught it to others (level 2). Because of that audience and the credibility he built, he was then able to go into seemingly unrelated markets to write The 4-Hour Body and The 4-Hour Chef (level 3).

Do you see what these (and many others online) have in common?

You have to start at level 1 and get really good at something. Then you can move to level 2 and teach others about what you’ve learned. Finally, as you build your audience, you can go broader with level 3.

So what does this mean for you?

1. You can’t skip levels. Let’s be honest…level 3 is pretty sexy. Being viewed as an online (or offline) business expert or guru seems pretty cool. Having lots of topics you can talk about that people look to you for is awesome. But there is no cheat code to skip to level 3. You have to start at level 1.

2. Pick ONE topic (or audience) for your level 1. You can’t start level 1 by trying to get good at a bunch of different topics. That doesn’t work. Pick ONE topic/niche/market you can dominate and then eventually you can move to other areas.

3. You can’t teach what you don’t know. I think it would be interesting to teach people about Facebook advertising. It seems to be a hot topic and a growing opportunity. But you know what I don’t know a ton about? Facebook advertising. So I can’t skip to level 2 and start teaching something I haven’t lived.

4. Start narrow and build broad. In the examples above, Pat, Michael, Amy, and Tim each teach a wide variety of different subjects and topics. But they didn’t start like that. They got really good at something narrow before moving to something more broad.

You can’t just skip levels by hopping in a magical green tube like this is Super Mario Brothers. It doesn’t work like that.

You want to get to the level that your mentors and heroes are at?

Be willing to put in the work they did that got them to where they are.

 

Image courtesy of: sunnyUK

Kiri

125 – How to Build Your Handmade Product Business with Kiri Masters


Kiri

One of the hottest trends right now is handmade, handcrafted items. From homemade craft beers to knitting to vintage jewelry, there’s a cornucopia of homegrown items, products and businesses thriving today.

On this episode Kiri Masters joins us to tell us about her own success in this area: she teaches people how to make their own custom lamps and lampshades.

We dive into how she got into this area, what her business entails, when she knew to make the leap and why it’s worked on this episode of How Did You Get Into That?.

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW:

  • What was her “light bulb” moment (pun intended)?
  • Why does she think handmade and DIY is so hip right now?
  • How long has she been interested in entrepreneurship?
  • Two ways to explore whether or not there’s a market for your business.
  • Her practical advice for transitioning into business ownership.
  • Why consulting gigs can be helpful when you’re just getting started.
  • And so much more!

BONUS MATERIAL:

  • How Kiri grew and scaled her custom lamp business, and her advice for you.
  • Why you should start slow when growing your business.
  •  Two alternatives to Etsy, and why you may want to explore them.

If you enjoyed this episode and want to hear a few additional minutes of the interview, Click here to get the exclusive bonus material.

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